2013 Media Coverage

A  sampling of popular media stories featuring our work from 2013 is below. Click here for current stories.

December 21, 2013
Boston Globe

Nutrition labels need to be visual
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein is quoted in Derrick Jackson’s weekly Boston Globe column, which discusses the debate over nutrition labeling for food.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

December 20, 2013
Buffalo News

Maintain your mental edge with exercise and diet
Dr. Irwin Rosenberg discusses the link between diet, neurological and cardiovascular health.
Dr. Irwin Rosenberg, Neuroscience and Aging La
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December 19, 2013
NutraIngredients USA

Astaxanthin’s boom, magnesium’s explosion, and omega-3 sustainability: Key lessons from NutraIngredients-USA’s special editions–Part 1
Jeff Blumberg was interviewed in March re the use of the term antioxidants. The interview is included in a summary article on important interviews of the year.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

December 18, 2013
Dr. John Pino
Tennessee Optometrist Dr. John Pino Offers Multi-Prong Treatment Involving Technology and Nutrition to Low Vision Patients with AMD and Other Vision Conditions
A USDA HNRCA study associated intake of high glycemic index foods with age-related macular degeneration risk is cited.
Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research

December 16, 2013
Fitness Magazine
Win the Cold War: 7 Ways to Boost Your Immune System
Article includes a quote from Dayong Wu, explaining why mushrooms are studied in immunology laboratories.
Dr. Dayong Wu Nutritional Immunology Laboratory

December 15, 2013
FoodConsumer
Curcumin prevents fatty diet induced obesity, fatty liver, dyslipidemia
A study led by Mohsen Meydani suggests that curcumin or turmeric, taken as a supplement or used as a spice in food, may reduce the uptake of LDL (“bad cholesterol”) in the blood and increase the secretion of fat. The findings, which are in mice, add to evidence that including the spices in a healthy diet may reduce the risk of obesity and fatty liver.
Dr. Mohsen Meydani,  Vascular Biology Lab

December 13, 2013
AARP Blog
From hugs to music: 7 new ways to help your heart
Brief article on ways to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke includes a study led by researchers in the Nutritional Epidemiology Program at the USDA HNRCA, which suggests that people whose diets are high in magnesium had low amounts of calcified artery walls, which is a marker of heart disease.
Nutritional Epidemiology Program

December 13, 2013
MedPage Today, The Gupta Guide
Fighting flu with wolfberries
The article summarizes a study by researchers at the USDA HNRCA, which suggests that goji berries interact with the flu vaccine to improve protection against the flu.
Dr. Simin Nikbin Meydani, Nutritional Immunology Laboratory

December 11, 2013
The Star-Ledger
Power flower: Hibiscus sabdariffa tea, recipes and foods on the rise
Dr. McKay is quoted re a 2009 study which found that drinking hibiscus tea may help to lower blood pressure.
Dr. Diane McKay, Antioxidents Research Laboratory

December 9, 2013\
The Daily Mail

Why diet cola could be making you FATTER and WRINKLIER: Low-calorie drink could be to blame for spare tyre and withered skin

A USDA HNRCA study associating cola consumption with lower bone density is referenced in this article appearing in a London tabloid.

December 4, 2013
WorldHealth.net
Expert review ‘recognizes and acknowledges’ the multiple health benefits of ‘special’ cranberry
J Blumberg led a review study which suggests that the North American cranberry may have health benefits beyond reducing the risk of urinary tract infections.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

November 29, 2013
Foreign Policy (magazine), Passport blog
Could dumping trans fat kill the rainforest?
The Food and Drug Administration announced in November a proposal to phase out hydrogenated oils, which contain trans fats, and removing them from the “generally safe foods” list. Article discusses the potential effects of this decision on the demand for palm oil, which grows in the rainforests of Malaysia and Indonesia.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

November 18, 2013
The Cranberry Institute
Cranberries Have Health-Promoting Properties, New Expert Review Reveals

Jeff Blumberg co-authored a review study on the health benefits of cranberries. Blumberg is quoted: Hundreds of studies show that the bioactive compounds found in cranberries improve health,” and “While we look forward to more research to better understand how cranberries affect our well-being and longevity, we know that including cranberries and cranberry products in a healthy diet is a great way to increase fruit intake.”
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

November 15, 2013
HealthDay News via WebMD
Many people ignore calories on fast-food menus
NYU researchers reported in a new study that an average of only 40 percent of people at fast-food restaurants use calorie counts posted on menus. Of those who use the calorie counts, only ten percent purchased foods with fewer calories. A. Lichtenstein responds to the findings: “Providing calorie information is not enough…If we want people to use the information, we need to raise awareness about its availability and most importantly, educate about its use.”
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

November 15, 2013
Korea Times (Seoul)
Don’t Forget Handful of Almonds A Day
Article focuses on research recently presented in Korea by Jeff Blumberg and Oliver Chen, focusing on the vitamin E content of almonds and their role in reducing inflammation and heart disease.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory
Dr. Oliver Chen, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

November 2013
ASBMB Today
(American Society of Biochemistry and Microbiology)
Counting Carbs
Allen Taylor is quoted in a feature article discussing the usefulness of dietary glycemic index in measuring carbohydrate metabolism. “…Sugars can react with proteins through the Maillard reaction to produce advanced glycation end products, which “accumulate with accelerating rates with age,” explains Taylor. The implication is that these accumulated glycated end products jam up the proteolytic machinery. “If you feed animals high-glycemic-index diets, sure enough, they accumulate these glycation products throughout their whole bodies, even though they are not diabetic,” says Taylor…”
Dr. Allen Taylor, Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research

November 8, 2013
HealthDay News
Exercise may help breast cancer survivors battle bone loss
B. Dawson-Hughes presented a study re bone loss prevention in breast cancer survivors at the annual meeting of the American Institute for Cancer Research. Dawson-Hughes is quoted from the news release: “Patients with breast cancer and several other cancers are at increased risk of rapid bone loss and fractures,” and  ”While not sufficient to prevent bone loss when taken alone, calcium and vitamin D are very important components of any pharmacologic regimen to minimize bone loss.”
Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, Bone Metabolism Laboratory

November 8, 2013
The Boston Globe
FDA moves to ban trans fat as a threat to health
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

November 8, 2013
The New York Times
F.D.A. Ruling Would All but Eliminate Trans Fats

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have proposed measures to phase out artificial trans fats from the American food supply, and eventually removing the hydrogenated oils they come from off of the list of FDA foods that are “generally recognized as safe”. As the rules change, scientists are concerned about the potential for increased consumption of saturated fats, which are also unhealthy. ALichtenstein is quoted saying that trans fats account for about one percent of the American diet, as opposed to twelve percent saturated fats.

November 7, 2013
CBS MarketWatch online
FDA allows 20% margin of error on food labels
Studies published in BMC Medicine and the Journal of the American Dietetic Association (JADA) have reported that supplements and calorie labels on frozen foods (respectively) are inaccurate. Sue Roberts, who led the study in JADA, is quoted saying she would not be surprised if calories are not the only part of food labels that are inaccurate, and that these labeling inaccuracies that are allowed by FDA may negatively impact the weight and health of Americans.
Dr. Sue Roberts, Energy Metabolism Laboratory

November 6, 2013
The Tea Council of the U.S.A., Inc.
New Research Shows Tea May Help Promote Weight Loss, Improve Heart Health and Slow Progression of Prostate Cancer

Jeff Blumberg was compendium editor for a supplement of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition focused on tea and is quoted in this news release on the quality of research. “The scientists who contributed their original research and insights are among the best in the world, and together, this body of research has significantly advanced the science of tea and human health…”
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

November 6, 2013
FoodConsumer
Vitamins prevent cognitive decline
Article summarizes a June study published the Journal of Aging Research, led by E. Johnson, which suggests that supplements containing the antioxidants known as carotenoids (found in vitamin A) may protect against cognitive decline.
Dr. Elizabeth Johnson, Carotenoids and Health Laboratory

November 6, 2013
MujerHoy.com
(Madrid, Spain)
To eat and not get fat? (translation)
J. Ordovas is quoted on the prospects of the creation of a “low-calorie bread”, suggesting that the strategic use of vegetable fibers may be key to their development.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

November 4, 2013
Nevada Appeal (Lahontan Valley, NV)
Sam Bauman: Weightlifting is a good way to prevent falls and fractures
A lecture on the benefits of strength training for older adults included evidence from studies by researchers at the USDA HNRCA which found that regularly training could increase strength and reduce falls and balance.

November 1, 2013
Huffington Post, Lifestyle (United Kingdom)
Soda Tax Would Reduce Obesity In The UK, Study Shows
Slide 4 of 7 re health effects of soda consumption cites a study finding from Tufts researchers that suggests caffeinated soft drinks were associated with lower bone density in women.

November 1, 2013
Business Insider
Eggs Are Much Healthier Than People Realize
Op-ed piece aims to dispel the myths about eating eggs and references studies which found eggs do not increase heart disease risk. A Lichtenstein is quoted about low-density lipoprotein (“the bad cholesterol”), which plays a significant role in heart disease risk.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

October 31, 2013
R7.com (Brazil)
The best fish for your health (translation)
Article references findings from Tufts researchers that suggest fish consumption may help slow the progression of macular degeneration.

October 29, 2013
Latin Times
Pasta And Depression Linked? Study Finds Carbs And Red Meat May Cause Mood Disorders
A study led by N. McKeown which found that high refined grain intake may play a role in how much visceral fat tissue an individual has (a trigger for heart disease) is referenced in this article.
Dr. Nicola McKeown, Nutritional Epidemiology Program

October 28, 2013
WBUR, Radio Boston
‘Home Ec’ For All
A. Lichtenstein is an in-studio guest, discussing her 2010 JAMA editorial advocating for the reintroduction of home economics to school curricula. “Children are not picking up these basic cooking skills, and shopping skills, and planning skills that they used to from their parents…therefore, we need to be a little more proactive in providing them to the students.”
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

October 24, 2013
Europa Press (Madrid, Spain)
Ordovas says that personalizing medicine through genomics will improve cardiovascular disease prevention (translation)

At the 2013 Self Care Forum in Spain, J. Ordovas discusses how the emerging field of nutrigenomics may be used to develop better prevention methods for cardiovascular diseases. “It is necessary to classify individuals into genetic groups to determine the risk of disease…”
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

October 23, 2013
Chicago Tribune
Maintain your mental edge with exercise and a brain-boosting diet

I. Rosenberg, E. Johnson, and T. Scott provide tips on how to maintain cognitive and physical health later in life.
Dr. Irwin Rosenberg, Neuroscience and Aging Laboratory
Dr. Elizabeth Johnson, Carotenoids and Health Laboratory
Dr. Tammy Scott, Neuroscience and Aging Laboratory

October 10, 2013
International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF)
Osteoporosis is a major threat to women and their future independence, new report warns

Dr. Dawson-Hughes is quoted on the urgency of bone care for menopausal and postmenopausal women: “Although the earlier prevention begins the better, when a woman reaches menopause she must not delay any longer…” Dawson-Hughes co-wrote an IOF report suggesting that postmenopausal women are the most vulnerable to osteoporosis and fractures.
Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, Bone Metabolism Laboratory

October 6, 2013
The Guardian (United Kingdom)
Women and weight training: a heavy duty
Resistance training with weights can provide multiple health benefits among men and women. Article encourages more women to complete muscle strengthening exercises and references a study co-authored by I. Rosenberg and former USDA HNRCA researcher Bill Evans.
Dr. Irwin Rosenberg, Neuroscience and Aging Laboratory

October 4, 2013
WGBH Radio
On Campus, Government Shutdown Undermines University Research (audio)
Dr. Meydani discusses the impact of the federal government shutdown on the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging,
Dr. Simin Nikbin Meydani, Nutritional Immunology Laboratory

October 2, 2013
Huffington Post UK, Lifestyle
5 Superfoods in season this October 2, 2013
Slide 6 of 13 at the end of the article on “Brain Superfoods” cites research by Tufts researchers suggesting that lutein, which can be found in spinach, may protect against cognitive decline.

September 30, 2013
20 Minutos (Spain)
Nutrigenomics, food and genome: the future in the fight against the obesity epidemic (Spanish)
At the launch of J. Ordovas’ new book, he discusses the future of nutrigenomics and  how work from this emerging field may help reduce obesity rates.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

September 30, 2013
ABC Radio National, Health Report (Australia)
Health problems in newborns of obese mother

On Australia’s national public radio show, Health Report, RSen discusses the health risks for children born to obese mothers. Sen also discusses research she is conducting with the Nutritional Immunology Laboratory at the USDA HNRCA, which suggests low iron levels could be one of the significant health problems affecting this group of children.
Nutritional Immunology Laboratory

September 27, 2013
Food Business News
Ready-to-drink iced tea innovations
Summary of benefits of drinking iced tea and tea in general includes a quote from J.Blumberg, “There is now an overwhelming body of research from around the world indicating that drinking tea can enhance human health”.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

September 24, 2013
Counsel & Heal

Exposure to Moderate Arsenic Increases Heart Attack and Stroke Risks

Findings from a new study suggest that regular exposure to low to moderate levels of arsenic may be correlated with an increased risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease. Researchers believe arsenic exposure was from groundwater and food. ALichtenstein, who was not involved in the study comments, “The best advice we can give people is to eat food that comes from a variety of different regions, as opposed to being raised in a single location. ..”
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

September 23, 2013
Wellesley Patch
Downton Abbey-inspired Fundraiser a Big Success
The Massachusetts Horticultural Society will be installing a garden in the USDA HNRCA’s lobby next week. The organic produce will be donated the Greater Boston Food Bank to help families in need.

September 20, 2013
Medical Xpress
Researchers investigating the many ways we get by with a little help from trillions of our bacterial friends
The government’s Human Microbiome Project designed to advance knowledge re the effects of microbiota on the body and overall health. Microbiota are over 10,000 species of bacteria and viruses that inhabit the gut, nose, mouth, throat, and skin. Article chronicles the work of multiple researchers at the USDA HNCRA that are studying microbiota to determine how they can be used to improve human health.
Dr. Simin Nikbin Meydani, Nutritional Immunology Laboratory
Dr. Martin Obin, Obesity & Metabolism Laboratory
Dr. Andy Greenberg, Obesity and Metabolism Laboratory
Dr. Sarah Booth, Vitamin K Laboratory
Dr. Jimmy Crott, Vitamins and Carcinogenesis Laboratory
Dr. Oliver Chen, Antioxidants Research Laboratory
Laurence Parnell, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

September 18, 2013
The Daily Campus, University of Connecticut
Nutritional lecturer speaks of fitter but fatter mice

M. Obin held a seminar on demonstrated the effects of inflammation and insulin resistance on obesity using mouse models at UConn.
Dr. Martin Obin, Obesity & Metabolism Laboratory

September 17, 2013
San Francisco Chronicle (SFGate.com)
Environmental advocates, dietitians leery of palm oil

The health and environmental effects of palm oil have been called into question recently. Article cites a 2006 study conducted by Tufts researchers that found individuals whose diets were high in palm oil had elevated levels of “bad” cholesterol.

September 17, 2013
Medical Xpress
Can probiotics keep gastrointestinal system healthy?

Research has shown that probiotics may help treat and lower the risk of certain types of diarrhea and improve overall gastrointestinal health. SGorbach and BGoldin have developed a probiotic that is said to be consistently effective in reducing the severity of rotavirus which commonly causes diarrhea in infants and children.
Dr. Joel Mason, Vitamins and Carcinogenesis Laboratory

September 11, 2013
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Latest Research on Ingredients That Make Chocolate, Olive Oil, Tea Healthful Foods
The ACS is holding a symposium on “healthful antioxidant substances” during its 246th National Meeting & Exposition. Among the abstracts being presented at the symposium is a preliminary study co-authored by O. Chen on cranberry proanthocyanidins (PAC).
Dr. Oliver Chen, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

September 6, 2013
Medical Xpress
Mild B-12 Deficiency May Speed Dementia

M.S.Morris, P.Jacques, and colleagues conducted a study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, which found that very low to mild vitamin B-12 deficiency was associated with accelerated cognitive decline in older adults, suggesting that a greater population of seniors may be impacted than is now thought.
Dr. Paul Jacques,  Nutritional Epidemiology Program
Dr. Martha Morris, Nutritional Epidemiology Program

September 5, 2013
El Mundo (Madrid, Spain)
The trash is another wealth of other (translation)

J. Ordovas writes about a recent study in Nature that highlighted the differences in intestinal bacteria between obese and non-obese study participants. By studying the bacteria, which can be found in stool samples, Ordovas states that one can possibly determine an individual’s risk for becoming overweight and obese.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

September 3, 2013
Yahoo! News
Eggs Don’t Deserve Their Bad Reputation, Studies Show (Op-Ed)

Op-ed piece aims to dispel the myths about eating eggs and references studies which found eggs do not increase heart disease risk. A. Lichtenstein is quoted about low-density lipoprotein (“the bad cholesterol”), which plays a significant role in heart disease risk.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

August 29, 2013
Atlanta Black Star
Eating a Variety of Berries Can Prevent Memory Loss

Summary of BShukittHale’s research demonstrating a link between berry consumption and cognition in rodent models.
Dr. Barbara Shukitt-Hale, Neuroscience and Aging Laboratory

August 26, 2013
Medical Xpress
Resisting rich foods: Quieting a gene in mice helps them say no to unhealthy meals

The article summarizes research led by A. Greenburg suggesting that a gene for fat storage can be silenced in mice. Silencing the gene led to smaller fat cells, less inflammation, lower triglyceride levels, and better insulin sensitivity.
Dr. Andy Greenberg, Obesity and Metabolism Laboratory

August 15, 2013
NEJM, Clinical Conversations (podcost)
The Mediterranean diet’s salutary interaction with risk-conferring genes

J. Ordovas is interviewed on the role of diet and genes in light of his recent study in Diabetes Care. The study found that being on the Mediterranean diet reduced the number of strokes in people with two copies of a gene variant associated with the development of type 2 diabetes.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

August 15, 2013
Consumer Reports
Be skeptical of health claims on food labels

Health claims on food labels may be misleading, article clarifies some of the common claims made on food packages, such as “heart healthy”. JBlumberg comments on food labels that claim high antioxidant content.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

August 14, 2013
The Scientist
Mediterranean Diet Reduces Genetic Stroke Risk

Researchers from the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and Spain identified a gene variant that appears to prevent stroke in carriers who were randomized to a Mediterranean diet as part of a clinical trial of more than 7,000 men and women in Spain
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

August 12, 2013
WorldHealth.net
Losing Muscle Power as We Age: A fat molecule may be a factor in the decline of strength

A small study conducted by USDA HNRCA researchers suggests that a fat molecule called ceramide may play a role in muscle deterioration in older adults. “We suspect that the increased storage of ceramide we saw in the older men, exacerbated by the presence of saturated fat, has a part in weakening the anabolic signaling that responds to resistance exercises and helps with the assembly of new muscle,” said senior author RFielding
Dr. Roger Fielding, Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory
Dr. Donato Rivas, Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory

August 11, 2013
The Boston Globe
Letters to the editor

A response to a profile of a Harvard nutrition scientist Walter Willett compares his work to the I Diet developed by S. Roberts.
Dr. Sue Roberts, Energy Metabolism Laboratory

August 7, 2013
Journal of Oak Park and River Forest
Healthy aging & nutrition
Helen Rasmussen is quoted about nutritional recommendations that should be addressed at different stages of life, starting in one’s 30s.
Dr. Helen Rasmussen, Nutrition Services

August 6, 2013
Time Magazine, Health & Family
The Truth About Antioxidants
J Blumberg, is cited as saying that 90% of adults fail to meet the recommended daily intakes for vitamins C and E. Blumberg is quoted: “That’s a huge shortfall. That doesn’t mean they couldn’t, but they aren’t. Vitamin C is another shortfall nutrient, or a nutrient of concern. Vitamin C and E are low in the typical American diet. With vitamin C, women require 75 mg a day and men 90 mg per day; that’s really low…”
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

August 3, 2013
Times News (Leighton, PA)
Exercise, eating right benefits brain

A number of studies have indicated that exercise and healthy eating may improve brain function. Article states that T Scott hypothesizes excess carbs could impair transport of glucose to the brain.
Dr. Tammy Scott, Neuroscience and Aging Laboratory

August 2, 2013
PreventDisease.com

Analysis: 10 Reasons To Love Your Tomatoes

List of health benefits from eating tomatoes references work from the USDA HNRCA and Boston University researchers that found that high intakes of lycopene were linked to an almost 30% reduction in the incidence of heart disease.

July 30, 2013
Miami Herald

Superfruits

According to researchers at Tufts, goji berries have one of the highest antioxidant capacity of any fruit.

July 29, 2013
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Add protein to every meal to maintain muscle mass as you age
Research from P Jacques and colleagues at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging suggests that physical activity combined with adequate dietary protein can protect muscle mass in middle-aged and older adults.
Dr. Paul Jacques,  Nutritional Epidemiology Program
Dr. Martha Morris, Nutritional Epidemiology Program

July 26, 2013
Los Angeles Times

Tea’s health benefits exist, but many claims remain cloudy

D McKay is quoted on the benefits of drinking tea: “There are few downsides to drinking tea. Both traditional teas (black and green) and herbal teas are made from plant-based products, which are good for you,” and  “The best scientific evidence we have on the health benefits of tea is based on research on black and green tea…”
Dr. Diane McKay, Antioxidents Research Laboratory

July 25, 2013
NPR, The Salt Blog and All Things Considered
Palm Oil In The Food Supply: What You Should Know (audio)
As food manufacturers work to reduce the amount of trans fats in their products, instead of using hydrogenated oils, many manufacturers are now using palm oil. “Optimally, the substitution [for partially hydrogenated oils] wouldn’t be palm oil. It would be a vegetable oil,” says ALichtenstein
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

July 22, 2013
The Washington Post, Health and Science, p E03
Kale has nutritional benefits and can be a tasty part of any meal
Consumer report on the consumption of kale details its health benefits and recipes to incorporate kale into meals.
Dr. Sarah Booth, Vitamin K Laboratory

July 3,  2013
Tr(Eat) Your Body Right

HealthyWomen.org (womenTALK blog)
Carefully considering the foods one eats in addition to exercising and sleeping well can help keep the body healthy as we get older. Nutrition plays a vital role in eye health; Tufts researchers, EJohnson and HRasmussen co-authored of a review of published literature which found that adults over 50 are not consuming the right nutrients to support eye health.
Dr. Elizabeth Johnson, Carotenoids and Health Laboratory
Dr. Helen Rasmussen, Nutrition Services

July 3, 2013
Fox News.com
10 Things You Should Be Doing to Boost Your Immunity

Slide one of 10 references work by Tufts researchers that found low fat diets may improve immune system function. SMeydani says high fat diets can make the immune system “sluggish and less functional.”
Dr. Simin Nikbin Meydani, Nutritional Immunology Laboratory

July 2, 2013
MedPage Today, The Gupta Guide
Breast cancer: Is there a risk reduction diet?
Alice Lichtenstein comments on a Chinese study suggesting that  fish-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) reduces risk of breast cancer by 5% per 0.1g regularly consumed.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

June 25, 2013
Europa Press, Health (Madrid, Spain)
Ordovas says that in about 5 years any overweight or obese person may use nutrigenetics (translation)
Ordovas lectures this week at a health forum to talk about the future of nutrigenomics, specifically the use of genetics in advising patients who are overweight or obese.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

 June 20, 2013
Bausch + Lomb
New Review Finds That Many Americans Over Age 50 are Not Getting Enough of Key Nutrients in Their Daily Diet to Support Their Eye Health

Elizabeth Johnson is co-author of a review of published literature focusing on eye health in older adults. Johnson is quoted: “Many adults don’t think about their eye health or sight until it’s too late to reverse the damage their eyes may have sustained. Our review shows that incorporating proper nutrition into the diet can help adults protect their eye health. It’s a small step that can go a long way.”
Elizabeth J. Johnson, Ph.D. Carotenoids and Health Laboratory

June 18, 2013
Reuters Health
Eating more red meat tied to higher diabetes risk
A new study led by the National University of Singapore researchers has found that increased consumption of red meat is associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. ALichtenstein, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts, warns that an individual’s entire diet must be considered, “If someone reduces their meat intake by substituting cheese, I don’t think they’re going to realize any benefit.”
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

June 18, 2013
Reuters Health
Starbucks to post calorie labels in stores nationwide
As large companies, such as Starbucks, have been mandated to display calorie labels of their foods and drinks, the effectiveness of this information in improving health has been called into question. Article cites findings from USDA HNRCA researchers that fast-food restaurants underreported posted calories by seven percent.  Dr. Urban comments, “There’s no measure in the (federal) regulations to address accuracy. It’s yet to be determined how that will play out nationwide.”
Energy Metabolism Lab

June 6, 2013
University of Cordoba
200 Scientists Will Participate In The VII Congress Of Science And Technology Of Food

Dr. Ordovas will give the inaugural lecture of the VII Congress National  of Science and Technology of Food
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

June 9, 2013
The Huffington Post, Taste blog
The worst foods at restaurants
Brief summary and list of high calorie foods from a study by Dr. Lorien Urban finding that small chain restaurants have higher calorie meals than their larger chain counterparts and average more in one meal than the suggested per take calorie levels.
Energy Metabolism Lab

June 9, 2013
Times of India (New Delhi, India)
13 natural ways to lower blood pressure
Article references ways to lower blood pressure mentions that research at Tufts found that drinking 3 cups of hibiscus tea per day can lower blood pressure by an average of up to 7 points in 6 weeks.

June 10, 2013
Philadelphia Magazine, BeWellPhilly blog
Stay forever young with good nutrition
Article mentions preliminary research findings from the USDA HNRCA suggesting that the polyphenols in berries can prevent toxic buildup in the brain connected to Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

June 4, 2013
Business Day (South Africa)
Eating less meat could make for a longer life
A new study suggests that a vegetarian diet may prevent chronic diseases and improve longevity. In the study, vegetarians were less likely to die over any period of time. Dr. Lichtenstein comments on the findings from researchers at Loma Linda University: “It’s important to note that the vegetarians in this study were more highly educated, less likely to smoke, exercised more and were thinner….It’s like everything else, you have to think about it in terms of the whole package.” This article originally appeared in Reuters Health on 06-03-13 and now appears in five other international news outlets.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

May 31, 2013
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
HHS AND USDA announce the appointment of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee
Alice Lichtenstein (Stanley N. Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and Director and Senior Scientist, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory) and Miriam Nelson (Friedman Professor and Adjunct HNRCA Scientist)  have been appointed to serve on the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. Lichtenstein has been appointed vice chair of the committee, whose recommendations and rationale will serve as a basis for the eighth edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Dr. Lichtenstein and Dr. Nelson
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

May 29, 2013
New Scientist (United Kingdom)
Beats a cure: Cancer prevention research takes off

The work of Joel Mason, director of the Vitamins and Carcinogenesis Laboratory at the USDA HNRCA, is highlighted in this article re the growing field of cancer prevention research. Mason investigates altered cellular activity in overweight individuals that develop colon cancer. “It looks like we are going to be stuck with a high prevalence of obesity in our society for the foreseeable future, so we need to find means of disconnecting this link between obesity and colon cancer risk,” said Mason.
Dr. Joel Mason, Vitamins and Carcinogenesis Laboratory

May 24, 2013
Huffington Post, Healthy Living Blog
Soda, other sugar-sweetened drinks may raise kidney stone risk, study finds
Slide 4 of 7 in the slideshow on soda’s health risks summarizes research led by KTucker before she left the  USDA HNRCA for Northeastern University which found that drinking soda 3 times a week led to an average of 4% greater bone loss than drinking any other beverage. Included is a quote from a 2009 Daily Beast article on the effect of soda’s phosphoric acid on the blood: “At that point, your body’s first priority is to restore a balance, so it leaches some calcium out of your bones to neutralize the acid.” Slideshow appears in a similar Huffington Post blog article from 3-13-13.
Dr. Katy Tucker, Nutritional Epidemiology Laboratory

May 2013
BBC GoodFood magazine (United Kingdom)
10 foods to boost your brainpower

List of foods that improves one’s cognitive abilities cites findings from USDA HNRCA researchers that blueberry consumption may delay short-term memory loss.
Antioxidants Laboratory

May 20, 2013
The Boston Globe
Small eateries better than fast food? Think again.
Sue Roberts is quoted throughout this article re a study she published in the new issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. Roberts and colleagues used bomb calorimetry to test the calorie content of 157 meals purchased at 33 independent and small chain restaurants in the Boston area, finding that the average single meal contained two to three times the estimated calorie needs of an individual adult at a single meal. “Small restaurants that don’t report calories appear to be the worst restaurants of all,” said Roberts.
Dr. Sue Roberts, Energy Metabolism Laboratory

May 2013
WholeFoods Magazine
Research reveals further benefits of oats-filled diet
Brief article summarizes findings of a USDA HNRCA study finding that avenanthramides, compounds found in oats, help keep blood cells from sticking to artery walls, reducing risk of heart disease.
Vascular Biology Laboratory

May 19, 2013
The New York Times, Letter to the Editor
Finding Time and Money to Cook
In a letter to the editor, Alice Lichtenstein, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, comments on a New York Times op-ed re cooking at home within time and financial constraints. She writes: “Perhaps the answer to both lies in teaching children starting at an early age how to hunt and gather food within the context of what is available in the 21st century”
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

May 13, 2013
Reuters Health
Small restaurants serving big calories, salt: studies
Sue Roberts is quoted throughout this article on a study she published in the new issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. Roberts and colleagues used bomb calorimetry to test the calorie content of 157 meals purchased at 33 independent and small chain restaurants in the Boston area, finding that the average single meal contained two to three times the estimated calorie needs of an individual adult at a single meal and 66% of typical daily calorie requirements. Article also appears in approximately 48 other sites, including Yahoo! Health and the Chicago Tribune.
Dr. Sue Roberts, Energy Metabolism Laboratory

May 9, 2013
News-Medical.net (Australia)
Researchers find that whole walnuts and their oil components can improve heart health
Consumption of whole walnuts or their extracted oil can reduce cardiovascular risk through a mechanism other than simply lowering cholesterol, according to a team of Penn State, Tufts University and University of Pennsylvania researchers.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

May 9, 2013
Associated Press
Study: Fish oil doesn’t help prevent heart attacks
Alice Lichtenstein responds to results of a study published in the current NEJM, which shows fish consumption is good for the heart, but fish oil capsules seem to be ineffective at lowering the risk for heart disease. “People who choose to eat more fish are more likely to eat heart healthier diets and engage in more physical activity,” and “It is sort of like breaking a fish oil capsule over a hot fudge sundae and expecting the effect of the calories and saturated fat to go away,” she said.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

April 2013
Arthritis Today
The Ultimate Arthritis Diet
Dr. Ordovas is quoted in an article focused on the benefits of the Mediterranean diet to arthritis patients. “Multiple studies confirm the role of nuts in an anti-inflammatory diet,” explains José M. Ordovás, PhD, director of nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston.” Arthritis Today is the national consumer magazine with approximately 800,000 readers published by the Arthritis Foundation.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

April 26, 2013
Ocean Spray
Mounting Body of Research on Cranberry Bioactives Further Supports the Fruit’s Whole Body Health Benefits

Research presented at the 2013 Experimental Biology conference have suggested that the components of cranberries, proanthocyanidins (PACs) and polyphenols, provide significant health benefits. JBlumberg, director of the antioxidants research lab at the USDA HNRCA, is quoted: “The body of evidence supporting health benefits from phytonutrients is rapidly mounting. “It is time to clearly identify the cranberry bioactives at work and to quantify how many milligrams of PACs and polyphenols we need in a day. We may not have a clear recommended daily allowance for PACs like we have for vitamin C, for example, but we should press ahead to a better understanding of their mechanisms and the amount needed in a day for overall better health.”
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

April 24, 2013
El Mundo, Health
(Madrid, Spain)
Olive oil: a year of good harvest (translation)

Dr. Ordovas, director of the Nutrigenomics Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, explains research on the association between olive oil as part of a healthy diet and the decreased risk of Alzheimer’s.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

April 21, 2013
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
More evidence berries have health-promoting properties
Summary of preliminary research presented by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists based at the USDA HNRCA at the ongoing Experimental Biology Conference. Their work thus far suggests that a berry diet fed to rats over a two month period has protective effects in brain function.
Dr. Shibu Poulose and Dr. Barbara Shukitt-Hale, Neuroscience and Aging Labotratory

April 17, 2013
Europa Press (Madrid)
Ordovas says the timing of meals can influence how foods interact with genes (translation)
Dr. Ordovas, director of the Nutrigenomics Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging,  explains the role of genetics and timing in nutrition: “Some people are early morning and other evening and that, in large part, is determined by genes and is associated with a certain risk of diet-related diseases. Therefore not only important what and how much you eat but , too, when you eat, ”
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

April 3, 2013
Reuters Health
Omega-3 fatty acids tied to longer life: study
Results of a new study by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health suggests that older adults with high blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids live longer than those with lower blood levels.  Article quotes ALichtenstein’s response to the findings:  ”Those people who consume more fish also consumed a higher level of fruit, more vegetables and less red meat. The question is, is it just that they consumed more fish, or is it a dietary pattern?”
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

April 2, 2013
AARP
Key to a longer life? Fatty fish twice weekly
The study doesn’t prove that eating fatty fish will help youlive longer — only that there seems to be a connection between the two, as Alice Lichtenstein, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston, told HealthDay News.
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

March 28, 2013
KSL-TV (UT)
This is what happens when you drink soda
Article references a study by USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging researchers regarding bone mineral density and soda consumption.
Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, Bone Metabolism Laboratory

March 27, 2013
Los Angeles Times, Booster Shots Blog
Workplaces can be good weight-loss sites, researchers say
Article summarizes a study done by researchers in the Energy Metabolism Laboratory at the USDA HNRCA and Massachusetts General Hospital finding that workplace weight loss programs are an effective means of losing weight. The study is published in the April issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Dr. Sai Das and Dr. Sue Roberts, Energy Metabolism Laboratory

March 18, 2013
The Inquisitr
Obese Mothers Have Iron-Poor Babies, New Study
Researchers at the USDA HNRCA and the Mother Infant Research Institute at Tufts MC found obese women are more likely to have babies with lower levels of iron. Triggered by a news release from July 2012 and a news article from Tufts in March 2013.
Dr. Simin Nikbin Meydani, Nutritional Immunology Laboratory

March 13, 2013
Nuts and seeds: More than they’re cracked up to be
Huffington Post Canada, The Blog
Dr. Blumberg, director of the Antioxidants Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, is quoted on the specific dietary benefits of almonds: “We have identified a unique combination of flavonoids in almonds,” said Jeffrey Blumberg, Ph.D., senior scientist and director of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at Tufts University. “Further blood tests demonstrated that eating almonds with their skins significantly increases both flavonoids and vitamin E in the body. This could have significant health implications, especially as people age.”
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

March 5, 2013
The Denver Post
Fat cure? Deleting the obesity gene in mice keeps them slim, CU researchers say
Dr. Greenberg, director of the Obesity Metabolism Laboratory at the USDA HNRCA, is noted as an author of a new study that found deleting a gene that regulates fat storage and metabolism in mice prevented them from becoming obese, even when fed a high fat diet.
Dr. Andy Greenberg, Obesity and Metabolism Laboratory

March 3, 2013
The New York Times
Experts Want More Studies of Diet’s Role for the Heart
A new clinical trial links the Mediterranean diet to reduced cardiovascular disease risk. ALichtenstein comments on the need for more research on diets to better understand the role of nutrition in one’s overall health: “We definitively need to test plausible diets, within the context of what is available and consumed in the U.S., that could lower the risk of heart disease.”
Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory

February 27, 2013
Business News Daily
Workplace Weight Loss Programs Work
Dr. Roberts, study co-author is quoted: “Based on our results, it seemed the weight-loss intervention became embedded in the office culture and also helped the weight of people who were not enrolled in the program.”
Dr. Sai Das and Dr. Sue Roberts if the Energy Metabolism Laboratory

February 25, 2013
El Mundo (Madrid)
Dieta mediterránea con aceite de oliva o frutos secos: el mejor aliado cardiovascular
In an interview with one of Spain’s largest daily newspapers, Ordovas responds to encouraging results from a RCT examining the Mediterranean diet and its impact on heart health.
Dr. Jose Ordovas, Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory

January 15, 2013
The Washington Post
Fresh vs. frozen: Eat enough of the good stuff and it doesn’t really matter
“If you are looking at something like fresh spinach, you are losing up to half the folates after about eight days,” Blumberg says.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

January 11, 2013
The Boston Business Journal
Bess Dawson-Hughes
Bess Dawson-Hughes named to Board of Directors. Dr. Dawson-Hughes has been appointed to the Board of Directors of the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, the non-profit organization that manages the research laboratory on board in the International Space Station.
Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, Bone Metabolism Laboratory

January 9, 2013
Time (Health and Family)
How super is your fruit?
Dr. Blumberg explains the lack of science behind the term “superfruit”.
Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, Antioxidants Research Laboratory

January 9, 2013
WCVB (Boston ABC affiliate)
Menu Calorie Listings Often Miss Mark, Experts Say.
Dr.Urban is interviewed for her study reporting on the listed calorie counts from restaurant menus.
Dr. Lorien Urban, Energy Metabolism Laboratory